Run, walk or stroll for South London and Maudsley

Do you love running or know someone who does?

We’re looking for people to run, jog or stroll for South London and Maudsley, and help us to provide even more world class care that goes above and beyond. Whatever your level of fitness, we’ve got two great upcoming events that you can take part in.

Royal Parks Half Marathon, 13.1 miles – Sunday 12 October. *Registration closes Wednesday 20 August*

This is one of the most scenic half marathons in the running calendar, taking in some of the best sights of central London. Check out the photos from 2013.

Visit our website for more information. Or, sign up today for just £50, and try to raise £400.

Or, if you’re not ready for a half marathon but still want to get involved, please join us at the first ever Kia Oval 5k Fun Run on Saturday 13 September. Whether you love to run or prefer to stroll, we’re inviting everyone to the official test ground for the England Cricket Team. Visit our website to register and for more information.

*Early bird registration closes Wednesday 13 August and under 16s take part for FREE!*

Do you know someone who’d like to take part in either of these events? If so, please forward this email on. Our events are open to everyone!

With best wishes,

Paul Munro
Events Manager
020 7848 7431


Mental Health Training – this week Thursday

Hello there

Healthwatch Southwark has got five free (no cost)n spaces for Mental Health Awareness Training that is happening this Thursday 27th February from 9.30am- 2pm. As one of our priorities is around Mental Health we thought it useful to know about the basics around the subject. More details are attached.

Mental Health Awareness course Feb 2014

Sorry for the short notice but if you are interested please get in contact with either me, Chip or Sec-Chan- 020 7358 7005. This is joint training with members of Healthwatch Lambeth delivered by service users and South London and Maudsley staff.

I look forward to hearing from you.

Best wishes,

Alvin

Alvin Kinch | Healthwatch Southwark Manager | Healthwatch Southwark | 1 Addington Square, Camberwell, London, SE5 0HF | d: 020 7358 7005 | t: 020 7358 7020 | f: 0845 305 2160 | www.healthwatchsouthwark.co.uk

Like discussing issues and finding solutions? Join our Small Groups Network–  25th Feb

‘1000 lives’ – Tell us your story to improve health services, Healthwatch Southwark is listening!

More groups have shared their work for the Value the VCS campaign, view the film clips here. value@casouthwark.org.uk  @valuethevcs


After the meeting about adult mental health services

Hello everyone,

I am emailing as you took the time to come to a meeting about mental health services in Lewisham, or you have expressed interest in being kept informed as the work progresses.

For those that were able to come on Jan 14th, – thank you for coming to hear the update and give your views.

I have attached a summary of the discussions that we had and the information that was given.   Please don’t hesitate to get in touch if you would like any more information about this work.  There are a number of documents and reports available.

summary of discussions Jan 15th 2014

With best wishes,

Alice

Alice Glover
Patient & Public Involvement Lead – Mood Anxiety & Personality CAG and Psychological Medicine CAG
email:  alice.glover@slam.nhs.uk tel: 020 3228 0959

113 Denmark Hill |The Maudsley Hospital | Denmark Hill | London | SE5 8AZ


Jobs and one voluntary opportunity

Some job Ads may very expire soon

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Department Co-ordinator – Leading Mental Health Charity

http://www.mind.org.uk/vacancies-and-volunteering/department-co-ordinator/

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Bromley & Lewisham Mind: Peer Support Manager

http://www.mind.org.uk/vacancies-and-volunteering/bromley-lewisham-mind-peer-support-manager/

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Bromley & Lewisham Mind: Peer Support Coordinator

http://www.mind.org.uk/vacancies-and-volunteering/bromley-lewisham-mind-peer-support-coordinator/

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PR & Communications Officer

Location: Southwark, London

(CALM, the campaign against living miserably, is a charity dedicated to preventing male suicide in the UK, which accounts for around 77% of all suicides.)

http://jobs.theguardian.com/job/4795071/pr-and-communications-officer/?CMP=jap_1125&utm_source=jobfeed&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=JobFeedXml%253aIndeed.co.uk&ProcessedTrackID=13452

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Drug and Alcohol Recovery Worker–South East London

http://www.publicsectorcareers.org/123834/drug-and-alcohol-recovery-workerand#x2013-south-east-london.html?ref=indeed

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Discharge Co-ordinator

EmployerKing’s College Hospital NHS Foundation Trust

http://jobs.kch.nhs.uk/job/-v300307?_ts=28

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NHS Job Index (South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust)

http://www.jobs.nhs.uk/cgi-bin/advsearch?vpd_code=334

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Volunteer Data Service Administrator – North Westminster Drug & Alcohol Service

http://jobs.theguardian.com/job/4775973/volunteer-data-service-administrator-north-westminster-drug-and-alcohol-service/?utm_source=jobfeed&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=JobFeedXml%253aSimplyHired&ProcessedTrackID=6085

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Mental Health Support Worker – Croydon

http://jobs.theguardian.com/job/4773805/mental-health-support-worker-croydon/?CMP=jan_1082&utm_source=jobfeed&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=JobFeedXml%253aIndeed.co.uk&ProcessedTrackID=13452

Via Matthew


South London and Maudsley on film: humanity and humour

Looking at a newspaper story about the murder of drummer Lee Rigby earlier in the year, Lloyd, who has a diagnosis of paranoid schizophrenia, said that hearing about schizophrenics in the news made him feel worse. He worried that he didn’t know his own mind and wondered if he himself could turn into a murderer too, since that’s what he read in the papers. Dealing with the symptoms of psychosis can be difficult enough in itself. Having to deal with society’s perceptions that people with your diagnosis are violent and unpredictable adds another level of difficulty.

Earlier today, I attended an advance screening of Channel 4′s new series on the realities of modern mental health care at the South London and Maudsley (SLaM) mental health trust.  In the screening room in the basement of Channel 4′s headquarters in Horseferry Road, a select audience sat in red plush seats watching one of four programmes in the series on modern mental health care. The series is entitled Bedlam and the name choice has caused controversy. To an extent it can be argued that, when a respected NHS trust calls a television series after a medieval asylum, it dilutes the strength of the case against Thorpe Park’s “mental patient scary fun” horror maze Asylum. But what of the series itself?

The episode previewed profiled the work of Speedwell community mental health team (CMHT) in Deptford, south London, over the course of a year. The four-part series, which starts at 9pm this Thursday, also covers the Anxiety Disorders Residential Unit, Lambeth Triage (the front line for emergency cases) and the older adults unit (over 65s).

Without giving too much away, we followed patients Tamara, Lloyd and Rosemary, all of whom experience psychosis. We saw them trying to cope with periods of illness, voices, delusional beliefs about bed bugs and with children being taken into foster care.  We saw them using prescription drugs as well as speed and alcohol to help manage their troubling symptoms. We saw them at times chaotic and disturbed, and at other times funny and happy.

We saw social worker Jim Thurkle doing his best to hunt down and help patients, a third of whom refuse to engage with him. We saw Dr Tom Werner doing his best to confirm the stereotype of the psychiatrist in the bow tie. We saw the fine line between enabling someone to live the life they choose and intervening in the interests of their own health and safety.

Not once did we see someone who could be considered a danger to anyone else. Not once did any of the patients present as anywhere remotely near the stereotype of the paranoid schizophrenic mad axe murderer. What we saw was patients struggling to manage their lives in difficult circumstances, and the professionals who tried to help them.

It was particularly interesting to see the work of a CMHT  which, along with GPs, carry out the bulk of psychiatric care in this country. As the booklet handed out at the advance screening says:

“The lion’s share of SLaM’s work takes place in a community setting, looking after more than 35,000 people with mental health issues. SLaM treats 8,000 psychosis patients a year; 6,000 of whom are based and treated in the community. We touch on different treatments available and see intense and moving interaction with social workers and mental health teams.”

As Pete Beard, the producer of the episode, who answered questions after the screening, said:

“We wanted to reflect the realities of this challenging work, following the actual narratives of people walking a tightrope with their mental health as it happened and the teams who act as a safety net. I feel that these realities are rarely reflected accurately in the media and as a result it is important to demystify the work performed as community teams, especially taboo subjects such as being sectioned”.

It was profoundly moving to see someone taken away from their own home, against their will, and detained with no legal authority other than the personal opinions of a social worker and doctors. No police arrest, no court process, no judge, no jury. Just a simple form signed, and you have no choice about even the simplest things like what you eat, where you sleep or what shampoo you use to wash your hair. And, on a more intrusive level, you have no right to refuse medication.

This extended scene cannot help but make you reflect on the balance of power between the state and the individual, and on what society deems to be acceptable norms of behaviour. This is especially so when you’re dealing with someone you don’t really know, as can be the case when a mental health team is called out to consider sectioning someone. Britain has a proud tradition of eccentricity, but that is not tolerated if you are deemed to be mentally ill. Simply being a nuisance to others but in no way dangerous to yourself or others can, ultimately, mean three people decide on your behalf that your quality of life will be improved by a compulsory stay in a locked psychiatric ward.

The sectioning sequence made me think about the boundaries or free will and autonomy and to what extent people’s peculiarities are tolerated. I have been on the receiving end of such a process, and it changed my life irrevocably. As Dr Baggaley said, when he’s taken part in sectionings he does wonder whether this was what he trained for. Although he sees it as difficult, he does see it as necessary.

Dr Baggaley described the person in question as a “revolving door patient” who would face repeated hospitalisations, some under section (compulsion), for the rest of their life. And yet this is someone who will – under the current welfare benefits system – also face repeated Work Capability Assessments. It is hard to see the point of such assessments in this case particularly since, as Dr Sarah Wollaston MP wrote today, WCA’s are not geared towards helping people with mental health problems find and retain employment.

One of the things which struck me in this episode was the amount of humour. Despite their difficult circumstances and troubling symptoms, the patients followed could come across as affable, amenable and warm-hearted. Ripples of laughter would regularly rumble across the audience, and not just because viewers were looking for a little light relief in what was, after all, a serious topic. As with any other fly-on-the-wall documentary, the colourful charaters in this episode were full of humour. The seriousness of the subject matter made the flashes of levity even more welcome.

Overall, this preview episode was intimate, insightful and profound. It showed human beings in all our difficulties, complexities and ambiguities. It showed the realities of trying to combat the stigma around mental illness with humanity and humour. It showed that danger and fear are the least of the concerns of the CMHT.

On a final note, I will end with a criticism that was raised by audience members with personal experience of mental health services: namely that the episode was somewhat naive and unrealistic. Audience members had received far worse experiences of mental health care, or had been able to deliver a far worse service due to cutbacks. It was acknowledged by the film makers that Speedwell CMHT had a ring-fenced budget, so had not been under the same constraints and workload other CMHT’s they’d liaised with had.

It was also highlighted that a lot of the difficulties patients needed help with were practical, and that these needs were not being met. The patients were unable to deal with these matters themselves and therefore they were stuck in difficult circumstances. Examples were the bedbugs which did actually exist in Tamara’s flat. It was not a delusional belief (though its extent may have been) and dealing with that practical problem may have lessened her delusional symptoms. This and her use of amphetamines may also have been the way she managed the immense sorrow of losing her children. Lloyd appeared to be using alcohol to numb his pain.

With a series planned over two years and filmed over twelve months, much footage will have ended up on the cutting room floor. It’s a shame, however, that the close relationship between medical help and social support, and the parts played by talking therapies and thereapeutic activities, were overlooked completely in this preview episode.

Nor was the 9% reduction in inpatient beds in the past 2 years mentioned.  Nor were the terrible cuts to community mental health services mentioned.

On the other hand, as Madeliene Long, SLaM chair said:

“Despite it affecting so many people, mental illness is still poorly understood. The stigma and discrimination that people face can make their mental health even worse and can prevent them from seeking help. So it’s really important that we do everything we can to raise awareness, challenge stereotypes and promote the facts about mental health. I’m really pleased that we have been able to work with Channel 4 and The Garden Productions on such an ambitious project which sets out to do exactly that.”

As executive producer Amy Flanagan said,

“Many of these patients had lived long lives with no history of mental illness. It could happen to our parents, to us.”

And, if it does happen to us or someone we know, programmes such as these will mean it feels a little less alien and a little more a part of everyday life.

Via http://sectioneduk.wordpress.com via Bridget


Bupa partners with NHS for mental health services

Bupa has announced it will partner with South London & Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust and Tavistock & Portman NHS Foundation Trust to provide mental health services.

The two foundation trusts will provide clinical advice on mental health services to Bupa, to help it achieve its ambition to be “a world leader in mental healthcare” according to a statement.

The organisations involved have expressed hope that the partnership will help build understanding of the relationship between mental and physical health and how integrated services for mental health can be developed.

Dr Katrina Herren, medical director of Bupa Health Funding, said: “Through our work with the Tavistock & Portman and South London & Maudsley NHS Foundation Trusts we are looking forward to significantly improving and differentiating Bupa’s mental health services.”

Via http://www.healthinvestor.co.uk via Matthew